Breaking New Ground

Reconnecting People with The Brecks

© NWT

© NWT

Brecks Uncovered

Norfolk and Suffolk Wildlife Trusts worked together to run this project for primary schools in the Brecks. Every child in each of the 10 primary schools in the project was involved, learning about the natural environment, biodiversity and heritage, starting with assemblies which reached over 2000 pupils. Each school made a field trip to either Grimes Graves, Knettishall Heath or Lackford Lakes.

In year 1, the aim was to visit schools and begin to engage them in the Brecks through whole school assemblies and workshops within the school grounds. This introduction was particularly useful before the field trips to classic Brecks sites in years 2 and 3. At Grimes Graves, KS2 pupils explored the excavated mine shaft and surveyed the Brecks flora on the site. They then went on to produce artwork based on their visit which was displayed at their schools. The trips to Lackford Lakes and Knettishall Heath explored the biodiversity, history, geology, archaeology and culture with pupils collecting leaves, identifying plants, spotting bugs and taking bark rubbings. These trips were supported by volunteers, some from the wildlife trusts and some were parents of the visiting children.

To embed learning about the Brecks into the learning resources for the schools, 32 teachers were trained during twilight sessions as part of their professional development. Teachers found the training very useful and remarked that they will continue to use the outdoors in the Brecks to cover aspects of their curriculum. It was originally envisaged that school governors would also be trained but there was little interest generated. More teachers were trained in lieu of the governors which will be more useful in the long run for local school children.

 

LEGACY

 

  • Resources created specifically for the project will be used by the trusts and schools into the future.  
  • Materials such as soil augers and bug boxes will continue to be used by schools for learning.
  • A legacy of ‘Action for Wildlife’ was instilled in the children and schools.
  • New contacts with schools will open up even more learning opportunities.

I think I've seen my class in a whole new light being part of today. Children who were perhaps quiet in the classroom have been more vocal. I've learnt a lot and I hope to take my class out a lot more often.

Year 5 teacher

Gallery

Brecks Uncovered
Brecks Uncovered
Brecks Uncovered
Brecks Uncovered